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Kim Hye-soo returns with Netflix’s ‘Juvenile Justice’

By Lee Si-jin

Published : Feb. 23, 2022 - 16:18

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Actor Kim Hye-soo poses for a photo before an online press conference on Tuesday. (Netflix) Actor Kim Hye-soo poses for a photo before an online press conference on Tuesday. (Netflix)
Top actor Kim Hye-soo will make her Netflix debut Friday in yet another legal drama, “Juvenile Justice,” following the 2020 SBS’ courtroom drama series “Hyena.”

“Before ‘Juvenile Justice,’ I thought I continued to have an interest in juvenile delinquency. After studying real cases, learning from the juvenile court judges and taking the role of Sim Eun-seok, a judge who despises juvenile offenders, I learned that my interest was only the tip of the iceberg,” Kim said during an online press conference on Tuesday.

“I realized that my interest was more of a regret, anger and emotional approach to the court’s decisions. The series provided me an opportunity to think about the fundamental problems of society and a balanced view toward juvenile offenders,” the actor added.
Actor Kim Hye-soo plays the role of charismatic judge Sim Eun-seok in “Juvenile Justice.” (Netflix) Actor Kim Hye-soo plays the role of charismatic judge Sim Eun-seok in “Juvenile Justice.” (Netflix)
Helmed by director Hong Jong-chan, who was behind many hit drama series including “Master’s Sun” (2013), “Dear My Friends” (2016) and “Live up to your name, Dr. Heo” (2017), the series presents the clash of different beliefs and standpoints of four judges working at the juvenile court.

Kim is joined by veteran actors Kim Mu-yeol, Lee Sung-min and Lee Jung-eun who star as juvenile court judges.
From left: Actors Kim Mu-yeol, Kim Hye-soo, Lee Jung-eun and Lee Sung-min pose for a photo before an online press conference on Tuesday. (Netflix) From left: Actors Kim Mu-yeol, Kim Hye-soo, Lee Jung-eun and Lee Sung-min pose for a photo before an online press conference on Tuesday. (Netflix)
“Our work is not intended to provide an answer to the issues (of juvenile delinquency) nor speak for one particular side,” the director said. “I believe that young offenders are not the only people who bear responsibility. By highlighting the various social problems that are closely related to juvenile crimes, our series hopes to present balanced opinions with different perspectives.”

Though there have been many courtroom dramas in the past, screenwriter Kim Min-suk said it was unprecedented for one to focus so heavily on judges’ lives, especially those that work in the juvenile court.

“There were many legal dramas in the past, presenting fierce arguments between prosecutors and lawyers. And seeing the judges, who seem to sit still like a doll, triggered my curiosity,” Kim said.

It led him to research into juvenile court judges and cases. After attending a real trial, meeting 50-60 people who are closely involved in the issues and visiting various facilities, including youth recovery centers, the writer started to put together the storyline, trying hard to remain impartial on the attention-drawing issue of juvenile crimes.

The 10-part series will be released on Netflix Friday.