Back To Top

First ‘blood moon’ in three years expected Wednesday night

Total lunar eclipse to peak for 18 minutes starting at 8:09 p.m.

The total lunar eclipse in 2018 (Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute)
The total lunar eclipse in 2018 (Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute)
A total lunar eclipse will take place Wednesday night, according to the Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute.

The eclipse, which can be observed in the Americas, Asia, Australia and Antarctica, and over the Pacific and Indian oceans, will peak for about 18 minutes starting at 8:09 p.m. Korean Standard Time.

Although the unusual celestial alignment will begin before moonrise, the full visual effects will only be clear once the moon has risen fully.

It will be South Korea’s first total lunar eclipse since July 2018.

A total lunar eclipse happens when the Earth passes between the sun and the full moon and blocks the sun’s direct rays. In other words, the moon is in the Earth’s shadow.

But instead of going dark in an eclipse, the moon takes on a red color because the Earth’s atmosphere scatters the sun’s blue rays but still allows red light past. A total lunar eclipse is called a “blood moon” for this reason.

Wednesday’s eclipse will be a “super blood moon” because the moon and the Earth are at their closest point, so the moon will be at its biggest and brightest.

For optimal viewing conditions, the Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute said, observers should seek out a clear sky, away from tall buildings or mountains, and face southeast.

The National Science Museum will livestream the eclipse via its YouTube channel.

By Kan Hyeong-woo (hwkan@heraldcorp.com)
MOST POPULAR
LATEST NEWS
padcast
Korea Herald Youtube
subscribe