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[Gadget Review] Samsung’s Clean Station brings small but groundbreaking liberation

 


Many readers must have mistakenly dropped the dustbin of a vacuum cleaner at least once while cleaning it out. Worse still, all the dust, hair and unknown particles that are stuck together have to be dug out manually so they can be thrown in the trash.

While technology advances among vacuum cleaners have been pronounced in recent years under the lead of manufacturers like Dyson, my try at using Samsung Electronics’ Clean Station for Jet vacuum was extremely satisfying.

While, admittedly, Samsung’s vacuum cleaner was not my first choice, the innovation came in how to empty the dustbin.

The automatic Clean Station was unveiled early this year by Samsung’s consumer electronics division as a hygienic dust disposal solution to empty the dustbin of a vacuum cleaner. It’s a 60-centimeter-high rectangular column designed to stand next to the Jet cleaner. Yes, it is another appliance you have to buy, but I felt it was worthwhile, after three months of using it.

(Photo by Song Su-hyun / The Korea Herald)
(Photo by Song Su-hyun / The Korea Herald)

When the dustbin is full, users are advised to separate it from the vacuum cleaner and place it on top of the Clean Station. Once the bin fits into the Clean Station, a blue LED light is turned on, and the station automatically empties it.

The automatic system features Samsung’s proprietary Air Pulse technology, which pulsates the air in the dustbin to shake off trapped dust.

The dust is then collected in a 2-liter bag inside the machine, which can easily be replaced every two to three months.

When the light becomes red, it means the dust bag is full and needs to be replaced. 
(Photo by Song Su-hyun / The Korea Herald)
(Photo by Song Su-hyun / The Korea Herald)

In comparison with the Dyson V11, where a user needs to firmly push the red bin release button that will slide down to open the bin base and contact with dust is inevitable, the Samsung Clean Station prevents dust from scattering in the air.

Samsung boasts that the Clean Station also has an anti-dust emitting structure that has been verified by Underwriters Laboratories to prevent ultrafine dust from getting released back into the air while the dustbin is being emptied out. The five-layered HEPA filtration system traps up to 99.999 percent of fine dust particles, the company says.

But such suction power doesn’t really matter anymore in the cord-free vacuum cleaner market as manufacturers are capable of providing up to 200 watts.

Additional solutions like the Clean Station can clearly attract consumers and create a new market for the vacuum cleaners. Perhaps Dyson can take a pointer from Samsung on that.

By Song Su-hyun (song@heraldcorp.com)

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