Back To Top

Meet Egyptian treasures in Korea

The coffin of an ibis a bird associated with Thoth, the god of wisdom and writing (NMK)
The coffin of an ibis a bird associated with Thoth, the god of wisdom and writing (NMK)
Lovers of ancient history have another full month to view a large collection of Egyptian artifacts in Seoul.

The National Museum of Korea’s Egyptian exhibit, organized jointly with the Brooklyn Museum in the US, a museum known to hold significant Egyptian artifacts, has been extended until March 1, according to the NMK.

The exhibition, titled “Story of Life, Death, and Resurrection,” is being held at the national museum’s World Art Gallery, which opened in December 2019.

Some 94 Egyptian antiquities, artifacts and cultural assets held by the Brooklyn Museum were originally scheduled to be shown at the NMK for two years.

While the exhibition drew keen public interest, the museum was shut down four times in 2020 alone as part of the government’s measures to prevent the spread of COVID-19. 

The Egypt section in the World Art Gallery at the National Museum of Korea (NMK)
The Egypt section in the World Art Gallery at the National Museum of Korea (NMK)
A bird shaped “ba,” meaning “soul” in Egyptian mythology, which functions as an amulet (NMK)
A bird shaped “ba,” meaning “soul” in Egyptian mythology, which functions as an amulet (NMK)
The NMK requested an extension of the show and the Brooklyn Museum approved the request, allowing for the special exhibition to continue through March 1.

Even after two years, the Egyptian exhibition is one of the most frequently visited shows within the museum for family visitors, according to the museum.

Formed along the Nile around 3,000 B.C., the Egyptian civilization achieved remarkable heights in the fields of astronomy and mathematics, spurred by the need to solve the river flooding issue. The historical significance of Egypt can also be found through its hieroglyphic culture, which show Egyptians’ firm belief in the concept of eternity after death.

Coffins of Egyptian mummies and animals worshipped by Egyptians that date back some 2,700 years are on display, along with an animated display that explains in detail the process of making a mummy. A replica of a papyrus of Hunefer, a royal scribe to Seti 1, the second pharaoh of the 19th dynasty of Egypt, is also on display.

The museum is open seven days a week. Admission to the Egyptian exhibition is free to all visitors.

By Kim Hae-yeon (hykim@heraldcorp.com)
MOST POPULAR
LATEST NEWS
padcast
Korea Herald Youtube
subscribe