NATIONAL

Curtain falls on OECD science forum in Daejeon

By KH디지털2
  • Published : Oct 23, 2015 - 13:25
  • Updated : Oct 23, 2015 - 13:25

A global meeting of science ministers and experts closed in Daejeon on Friday after five days of intensive activities including the adoption of a declaration on inclusive and sustainable science development.

Dubbed the "world science summit," the OECD Ministerial Meeting Daejeon 2015, World Science & Technology Forum brought together some 3,800 officials and delegates from 75 countries, including developing countries in Asia, and 12 international organizations, to seek ways for shared economic growth via science and technological innovation.

As the finale of the event, organizers hosted a national conference on science development, where 500 participants discussed detailed action plans for the Daejeon Declaration, which was adopted on Wednesday after a two-day ministerial meeting.

In a closing ceremony, South Korean Minister of Science, ICT and Future Planning Choi Yang-hee pledged Seoul's full support for the implementation of the declaration.

"The global science summit was very meaningful in that South Korea, as the host country, led the adoption of the Daejeon Declaration, which provides a milestone for the next 10 years of the world's science and technology," ICT Minister Choi Yang-hee said.

"Science technology is the only method that can support sustainable and inclusive growth," Choi added. "Countries have agreed to join forces and open their doors in the realm of science through the meeting."

Choi added South Korea is the "righteous" nation to fulfill the vision shared during the meeting.

"The meeting has paved ways to accelerate discussions on inclusive growth around the globe," Choi said. "South Korea has taken the central part in such a process."

The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development has said the declaration will work as the guideline for their science-related policies down the road.

Among other things, the declaration says that science and technology will improve the quality of life for all citizens as they increase employment, productivity and economic growth in a sustainable manner over the long term.

South Korea's ICT ministry said the global science meeting is significant in that delegates from the Association of Southeast Asian Nations have also been invited.

Along with government delegates, world-famous business executives and scholars also visited Daejeon, the science hub of South Korea located 164 kilometers south of Seoul.

Futurist Jeremy Rifkin shared ideas on how "the zero-margin" concept, which refers to a system where it costs almost no resources to benefit an additional person on the back of technology, should be developed further to cover energy issues.

Sergio Bertolucci, the research and computing director at the European Organization for Nuclear Research, and Phil Diamond, director of Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics also highlighted the importance of "open science," which is aimed at making technology more accessible to people at all levels.

The OECD Committee for Science and Technology Policy also held a closed-door meeting on Thursday to discuss detailed ways to roll out the vision shared through the Daejeon Declaration.

South Korea said another key achievement of the five-day gathering was the promotion of Seoul's creative economy policy to the world as a new paradigm for economic and social development.

The creative economy vision, initiated by President Park Geun-hye, calls for creating new growth opportunities through merging different industries, especially through information and communications technology.

Delegates, including OECD Secretary-General Angel Gurria, visited a creative economy center located in Daejeon on Tuesday, where startups are invited to receive financial and other key support from the government.

Over the five-day gathering South Korea also held ministerial bilateral meetings with 12 countries, including New Zealand, Israel, Japan and Italy. It also hosted vice ministerial talks with seven countries including the United States and Germany. (Yonhap)