Back To Top
National

Koreans offer support for quake victims

Koreans have offered their condolences for the deaths and damage caused by the recent earthquakes in Japan.

Internet users have distributed the latest news online, shared information about the safety of their families and friends in Japan and expressed their grief over the tragedy.

“I would like to offer my condolences to disaster-stricken Japan. I feel sorry for the Japanese people. Let’s hope nothing serious happens from now on,” a woman said on her twitter account. Thousands of other netizens expressed their sympathy.

On the Agora page of Daum, one of the nation’s largest portal websites, thousands wrote words of consolation to the Japanese people. Some praised their prudence and calm attitude even in the most chaotic moments.

“I admire the Japanese people who did not run out on the streets, cry out loud, push other people to get out of the mess even when they were mobilized to shelters, facing the threat of death. They stayed calm, tried to stay as focused and orderly as possible, which has minimized the damage. This is something we should learn from them,” one netizen said. 
Japanese tourists arrive at Gimpo International Airport in Seoul on Sunday. (Lee Sang-sub/The Korea Herald)
Japanese tourists arrive at Gimpo International Airport in Seoul on Sunday. (Lee Sang-sub/The Korea Herald)

The National Red Cross said Saturday that it would launch fundraising campaigns to support the victims of the earthquake. The group aims to collect 10 billion won ($6.38 million). It will also arrange for 30 doctors from the Red Cross Hospital and Seoul National University Hospital to fly to Japan, mainly to take care of elderly citizens.

The organization will recruit volunteers for the relief effort.

“We will also cooperate with the Japanese Red Cross in searching for Koreans reported missing,” the group said in a press release.

Private groups are also moving to help the neighboring country. The Korean Church Relief has dispatched six relief agents with 50 million won in funds.

“We could not help but go to Japan to reach helping hands despite possible tremors that might hit the country again. We were also worried that the leak of radioactivity could harm people who are already devastated by the disaster,” Lee Suk-jin, leader of the group, said.

“It’s time to show our love, not only in the materialistic ways but with constant prayers and hope,” he said.

By Bae Ji-sook (baejisook@herald.com)
MOST POPULAR